Sky’s the limit for engineering student

Steven Cuciti tops the class to win Outstanding Graduate prize

Steven Cuciti’s story is one many young adults can relate to; after finishing high school in 2010 he struggled to commit to a career direction after finishing his first course, which was a Bachelor of Music.

“I had difficulty choosing what to study, I was not ready and starting university was a shock to the system because I had to take initiative,” he said, “I was in a rut after high school and didn’t not know what I wanted to do,” Steven said. 

Steven’s father, a mechanic by trade, shared some practical advice about what life would be like as a musician; and suggested he either commit fully to music and try to get freelance work, or combine it with other career options for more career stability. 

“My Dad suggested a two-pronged approach; study and work full time in engineering to support and develop myself, and then produce music on the side when I have time. I like this approach because the likelihood of breaking into the music world is low. If I do, and can turn it into a full time career, then that is an extra benefit,” said Steven. 

“I then chose engineering because science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workers are in such high demand right now, and they seem to be the future leaders and movers and shakers,” said Steven. 

Steven found that UTS:INSEARCH provided him with a way to start on the path to a career in engineering. “I changed my mind and came to UTS:INSEARCH to do a Bachelor of Engineering, and I became invested in being successful.” 

He then topped the class in his diploma, and is now in his Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering at UTS. Steven took out the Outstanding Graduate prize for receiving the highest Grade Point Average (GPA) in the Diploma of Engineering; the $5000 prize is one of 20 awarded by UTS:INSEARCH for the highest academic achievements in Semester 1, 2017. 

“I wanted to study engineering because I like learning about computers, the internet and programming. You are learning about how the world works; science and technology and engineering underpin it and keep the world going. “After graduating, I want to become a mechanical engineer. I also think engineering management would be an attractive area when I get older because it would allow me to develop complex management skills and improve my leadership capability.” 

Congratulating Steven on his success, Dean of Studies of UTS:INSEARCH, Tim Laurence, said, “We started offering a range of academic prizes three years ago so we could formally and publicly recognise the excellence and achievements of our students. We pride ourselves giving students the encouragement and environment they need to achieve their goals.” 

Steven feels that he is now equipped to keep focused on his study. “I keep pushing to reach my destination and I know, despite any setbacks, that I will get there.”

Outstanding Graduate for the Diploma of Engineering Steven Cuciti Ross Millbourne