INformant blog

Household Guide to Surviving Exam Time

Sally Payne Sally Payne
Associate Dean of Studies

With more than 77,000 students enrolled in one or more HSC subjects this year, many households across NSW will have a child in their final stages of preparing for an exam. Having survived an HSC household in the past few years, I know firsthand how stressful HSC exams can be for Year 12 students and their families.

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Why HSC maths and science are essential for the future

Sally Payne Sally Payne
Associate Dean of Studies

With 2.5 quintillion bytes of data being created every day, it is increasingly important for university graduates across all industries to be experienced in analysing and interpreting data, and those without solid foundations in mathematics and science may struggle. Concerningly, the percentage of students in NSW not studying any maths in their final school years has trebled since 2001

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Don't let your child's ATAR define them

Tim Laurence blogger Tim Laurence
Dean of Studies

Many students haven’t prepared for the possibility of getting a lower than expected ATAR. If your child is one of those who needs to consider other options, encourage them to start investigating other ways to get into a courses that leads to their dream career.

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Don’t baulk at the batik: 4 tips for doing business in Indonesia

Alex Murphy Alex Murphy
Managing Director

Indonesia is an emerging economic force and is currently the world’s third fastest growing consumer market. It is one of Australia’s most important bilateral relationships and Austrade estimates that there are currently more than 400 Australian companies operating in Indonesia.

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Count down to the HSC - five hints to keep perspective

Rowan Kunz Rowan Kunz
Guest blogger,
Founder, Art of Smart Education

The first HSC exam is fast approaching and it's important to ensure your final weeks of study are spent productively and efficiently, to maximise your results. The last few weeks before your exams can be used to refine your notes and identify any areas that need further review.

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Learning a language through cultural immersion

David  Larbalestier David Larbalestier
Director of Studies - UTS:INSEARCH

I commonly get asked: what is the best way to master a second language? My response is always the same; immerse yourself in the culture of the language you are studying, talk with people whose first language is the one you are studying and start to experience how the language is used in different scenarios.

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Supporting sustainable living in India with Pollinate – a student’s experience

Pratik Kumar Pratik Kumar
Communications student

An organisation working to provide solar energy to the Indian poor, Pollinate Energy, was started by a group of young Australians, and it provided me with a unique opportunity to become an agent of change. The very idea of using renewable energy and social entrepreneurship to create a sustainable living for the poor in India is incredible. The Pollinate program allowed me to get involved in active social change in my home country and to make a difference - while furthering my skills as a student and a communications professional. The theoretical knowledge I gained from my time at UTS:INSEARCH and the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), was ready for real-world application, and the Pollinate Fellowship Program gave me the platform to do just that.

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Building bridges between students, educators and business

Belinda Howell Belinda Howell
General Manager Market Development

In February this year, five influential organisations including The Business Council of Australia and Universities Australia pledged to provide more help for students to bridge the gap between the university classroom and the workplace, with the aim to create a more practical, highly educated and highly skilled workforce.

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Keep calm and know your options

Rowan Kunz Rowan Kunz
Guest blogger,
Founder, Art of Smart Education

The best piece of advice I would give Year 12 students who are about to receive their ATAR is ‘don’t worry’. It’s a bit of cliché (and something you’ve probably heard it a million times during your HSC year) but even if you don’t get the ATAR you need to get into your dream course there are still options available to you.

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Why study Communication?

Jennifer Banks Jennifer Banks
Program Manager, UTS Foundation Studies

Like many others, I would argue that communication is an important engine of the 21st century as daily life, including our work lives, is shaped by the fact that we live in a smaller, more connected, more globalised world. Communication is at the core of this, allowing us to explore and learn about other cultures, strengthen social ties, create business and personal relationships, and facilitate exchange of information.

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Brave new world of Design

Matthew Holt Dr Matthew Holt
Program Manager, Design

Design has certainly come of age. Once restricted to their defined role in the product development and marketing process, designers now contribute holistically and strategically to meet the needs of customers in this decade’s service and knowledge-driven economy.

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Breaking out

David - Director of StudiesDavid Larbalestier
Director of Studies

Studying a first-class English course in Australia is just the start of long-term language success. Informal friendships and social immersion are also essential to lasting linguistic learning.

A long time ago, in the early 70s, when I was trying to decide what I should study at university, a cousin advised that I should perhaps consider learning Chinese. Australia had just established diplomatic relations with the Peoples’ Republic of China and my relative was preparing to take up a posting in Beijing at the new Australian embassy there.

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We should match Asia's hunger for language

Tim Laurence blogger Belinda Howell
General Manager, Market Development

It’s a fact. Our neural networks are strengthened by learning a new language. So, compared with the ambitions of the policy makers and educators I met in South East Asia last week, the aims of the Asian Century white paper on language are arguably too modest. It’s true, some general goals have now been set and the right noises have been made. Australians, particularly young people starting out in their careers, should be building Asian 'literacy', not least by actually learning the languages of our near neighbours and trading partners. Worthy government commitments have, however, been met by scepticism from many who refer to previous short- lived and largely unsuccessful attempts to get us to learn Japanese or Indonesian in large numbers.

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Mind the Gap

Tim Laurence blogger Tim Laurence
Dean of Studies

Suitcases are packed and iPads charged as eighteen year-olds around Australia set off for that rite of passage known as the Gap Year. Nervous parents anticipate midnight calls from a Laos hospital or a Bali beach clinic and shudder. Next door, the proud parents ordering online textbooks for their soon-to be uni student, have no such concerns. But they should. Graduation and career success is by no means guaranteed. The growing gap between school and university means that more young people than ever will be alienated, isolated and ultimately fall at the first hurdle in tertiary education.

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Breaking through language barriers

Alex Murphy Alex Murphy
Managing Director

I'd always wanted to learn a language because I was interested in engaging with other cultures.

I'd been to the US and Britain, but when I was 16 I went to Indonesia to do a summer school at a university in central Java. It included learning batik, the martial arts and language studies while living in the university dormitories. I just loved it. I started my arts degree at Sydney University in 1980 following a gap year. I enrolled in linguistics and Indonesian and Malayan studies.

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